Tag Archive: CAW


Make a Difference in Your Purchase!

Did you know that what you buy can make a difference in our Country and our community’s now!! We are part of six billion people on the planet; the onus is on us North American’s – the upper 20% that consumes 80% of the world’s resources. Driving hybrid cars and limiting industrial emissions is great, but they are band-aid solutions if we don’t address the core problem: we have to consume less, to fix the environmental and ethical consequences of overconsumption. We can help by not purchasing products that contain lots of empty packaging. By leaving our packaging behind at the counter and telling the business you shop at the you didn’t need this packaging they would be responsible for disposing of the waste in extra packaging, in turn they might contact there suppliers to tell them that their customers don’t want extra packaging. By reduce the waste we create we can keep landfills from filling with harmful waste products that contain chemicals and non- bio-degradable materials that harm our environment. We also have the purchasing power to make a difference in our ethical shopping of non-sweatshop garments by insisting that the clothes we ware are made in North America or by companies that have not violated international human rights with child labour. Supporting Local farmers just makes sense. It’s fresher, safer then harmful chemicals used during transportation and best of all supports our local communities. Buying Canadian made products helps keep Canadians working. By just taking these few extra minutes to check where your spending your money can help slow globalization from driving down the cost to our communities. We are the consumers we have the power!!! I realize that not all products are going to be made in Canada… but if it means spending a bit more on a product that is made by my fellow Canadians then it might also be better material and better built. We have to hold business accountable for the products and services they sell. A recent report named the substance PERC (Perchloroethylene) a chemical used in the dry cleaning process to be hazards to our health and can lead to cancer or Liver failure, yet some dry cleaners say they would not stop using PERC. Perhaps a letter advising people that liver failure might occur by using their service is not as important as turning a profit at your customers loss.

Think Globally Act Locally

Think Globally Act Locally

Advertisements

…The governing Conservatives have 51 seats, and the Liberals 49. There are two Progressive Conservatives, including Murray, two unaffiliated Senators and one vacancy.

Progressive Conservative Senator Lowell Murray, who voted for the changes. The committee took out measures including those relating to government-owned Canada Post and Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. because they had little to do with a budget plan, he said.
“By my count, there were 10 parts of that bill that belonged in a budget implementation bill and 14 that were not,” he said in a telephone interview.

The Senate voted to study the committee’s recommended changes the next time it meets, scheduled for July 12. Members could pass the original bill or send the revised one back to the elected House of Commons, Murray said.

Liberal Party Senator Joseph Day, the committee chair, said the Senate should rework the budget legislation because it included unrelated items such as environmental assessments.
“Hopefully the government will get the message on this,” Day said.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-07-08/senate-committee-removes-measures-from-canada-budget.html

(This appeared as a comment by Ritch on my last post. It deserves to be highlighted as a guest post.)

The events at the G20 demonstration on Saturday have provoked a series of responses already. This article is not meant to review the events of the day itself but to look at the questions raised by the demonstrations.

Suffice to say the reaction of the police in arresting, detaining, and brutalizing nearly 1,000 people in the largest mass arrests in Canadian history exposes the serious attacks on civil liberties we face.

On Friday before the demonstration I was having a beer with a comrade in Halifax and of course discussion turned to the G20, we both agreed that this would be the perfect demonstration to go off without any property damage. If at the end of the day tens of thousands marched, thousands did sit-ins by the fence but the tactic of smashing windows was not employed then the summit would be a defeat for Harper.

We drew this analysis based on the fact that every where you went there was anger at the billion dollar price tag for security. At a time when thousands are struggling to make ends meet and see the cost of the Summits as exorbitant. Many, consciously or not, recognize that this money is being spent to the architects of the crisis; protecting those who gave billions to the bank while leaving workers and the poor to pay for it. Furthermore, in the lead-up, there was a growing polarisation with many being angry or frustrated with Harper’s attacks on civil liberties, on women’s rights, on the climate, on the economy, and more.

To have had a day of mass demonstrations and militant but non- violent action would have left Harper with egg on his face and given more confidence to those want to find ways to challenge Harper and the market.

Instead, the day went just like clock work—much like other summits. There’s a mass demonstration. A layer of people do a split from that march and then some engage in expressing their rage against the system by smashing windows and other acts. Given the world we live in, it is surprising that more of this doesn’t happen more often.

In response, the police hold back until the main march disperses. They wait for some damage to be done, and then they go on the offensive. They round-up and brutalize everyone left on the streets, including passers-by, peaceful protesters and those engaged in property damage. In Seattle, Quebec, Genoa, etc. this script has played out over and over again. The police wait until the mass organisations leave, then go after the rest. This strategy suggests that the police and the state are keenly aware of who they want—and don’t want—to provoke.

Within this the “black bloc” and their supporters utilise the larger rally and split marches to launch attacks on property and the police. Usually the police wait long enough for damage to be created before they respond. In these situations it is one of the few times the police wait to crack down. Continue reading

GET OFF THE FENCE

GET OFF THE FENCE!

Confrontational Anti-Colonial, Anti-Capitalist Convergence in solidarity with the People’s First Demonstration

1PM

Queen’s Park- And then onwards to the Fence

Working class people across Canada are under attack. From the foot-dragging at Vale Inco to the recent lock-out of Cadillac-Fairview workers to the looming cut backs on the public sector, it has become obvious that the municipal, provincial and federal governments are neither willing nor able to support people.

Corporations get bailed out, while people and the environment pay for their crisis. Global financial and environmental decisions are made by a few self-selected men and women at the G8 and G20 summits and forced down the throat of unionized and non-unionized workers the world over. Resisting unionists in the Philippines and Colombia are brutally murdered while migrant workers are killed on the job in Canada working in precarious conditions.
When this traveling circus comes to Toronto this June, we who work for change will gather to oppose them. We are workers, activists, students, parents, artists, unionists, anarchists with and without immigration status and more. We are the people — and we will not remain silent and passive as the elites celebrate their attacks on our lives and on the lives of people around the world.

On Saturday, June 26th, the People First March begins at 1pm at Queen’s Park. We are calling upon labour activists, migrants, community groups, poor and working people, women, queer folk, disAbled communities and others to join the Get of the Fence contingent as we creatively and energetically voice our discontent and stand in solidarity with labour struggle.

However, when the People’s First demonstration circles back to a so-called a ‘free-speech zone’ at the park’s north end, we will stay put. We call upon all organizations of people, all those that struggle for justice to stay and participate in a militant, confrontational demonstration where we challenge the global apartheid and injustices the fence represents.

On June 26th, when the march turns towards the protest pen, we invite you to go beyond the tired symbolism of parades and beyond the will of politicians. When the People First march turns back, we invite you all to continue on with us to confront the self-proclaimed G20 leaders and the security apparatus that will have occupied our city. We will take back our city from these exploitative profiteers, and in the streets we will be uncontrollable! This is a militant march where many forms of resistance and tactics are welcomed and respected.

Discuss this in your locals, in your organizations, with your friends and families. In your workplaces, in your meeting rooms, at the dinner table, plan to get off the fence and commit to taking the streets. Together, we will reject the authority of the G20.

For more information, contact torontospokes@ecologyfund.net

Here’s to 2010

Teeming with seminal moments throughout history as well as the provocative and moving imagery that defines our aesthetic, this calendar not only pays homage to activism’s past – it’s fuel to throw on the fire of future systemic change.

This year may well prove to be the lynchpin in the course of modern history … the moment we either turn to face the mounting specter of environmental collapse or, like in Copenhagen, fail to rescue future generations from a short, brutal existence. This is the year we decide: Do we bring salvation or damnation to citizens yet unborn?

The good news is that with crises looming on environmental, social and economic fronts, 2010 represents a time of unprecedented opportunities. This may be the moment that the world finally embraces the need for an absolute overhaul of global paradigms.

As the postmodern era wanes, what new movement will rise in its place? What grand new narratives are forming beneath us, preparing to sweep us along unexplored courses of human existence? We plumb the shrouded depths of this mysterious new zeitgeist and shine a light on some of the artists, philosophers and activists who are already there.

So let’s band together and navigate the dangerous, exhilarating course ahead!